Try a pourover

Try a pourover

Waiting out a recent rainstorm at Bittersweet Coffee in Huntington, West Virginia.  The place has a really nice coffee-house feel to it, relaxing.

 

Church window, Huntington West Virginia

Church window, Huntington West Virginia

Huntington, West Virginia

I recently enjoyed this short PBS Video segment on the photographer Ken Van Sickle of New York City.  Mr. Van Sickle is an older gentleman and apparently enjoys photographing in the same genre as I do, just shooting what you find interesting and trying to find the best way to present what you see in an equally interesting way to others.  His images are much more artistic though, he has had quite an eye, working for 6 decades on his photography.

The comments to the article are very interesting themselves, some invoking and debating a quote by Thomas Merton, whom you will recognize if from nothing more than my occasional discussion of him (providing you are a long time reader here).  Mr. Wallis made a comment that we can all agree upon, that the educational requirements for being a photographer have declined considerably during our lifetimes, assuming you are my age, give or take.  Our local camera club had a long standing requirement, lasting for decades (about 30 years at least) that once you reached the level of a an accomplished photographer, then you had to process and print your own images yourselves.  That was, of course, back in the black and white film and fiber based paper days.  Still, not a bad requirement.

 If the camera club, or any group, required their members to shoot RAW, use no automatic plugins or "artistic" apps, and then print themselves in order to reach whatever level deemed "an accomplished photographer", then how many would reach that level?  

 Still, I have never enjoyed images as much as I have during the past several years.  The argument can be made that it is the image that decides, not the process at all.

 

 

The Puttyroot Orchid

The Puttyroot Orchid

Carter Caves State Resort Park
Carter County, Kentucky

Awhile ago, I discovered Andrew Gibson on Instagram.  Mr. Gibson is a field botanist with The Ohio Division of Natural Areas and Preserves.  One of his more recent Instagram posts described Puttyroot as being one of our few overwintering wildflowers.  I was sure I had noticed these leaves in the forest from time to time and it took the last month of looking around to stumble across one, this specimen being at Carter Caves during my hike this week.  Evidently it isn’t a rare plant, I was probably just looking on the dry ridge-tops of Greenbo instead of the more moist and fertile hollows of the park.  Anyway, it was a joy to find the plant I had been looking for, especially at one of our home parks.

 

 

Milton Horn: The Family Is the Keystone of the Community

Milton Horn\'s “The Family Is the Keystone of the Community”

Charleston, West Virginia

I’ve fallen behind on my images, I’ll attempt to catch up soon.  With this photo from the visit to Charleston awhile back, we revisited the wonderful but dreadful keystone by the sculptor Milton Horn.  Age seems to make it more sorrowful.  I first posted a picture of it two years ago this month (you can see it here) which is when I first attempted to learn a bit about Mr. Horn.  I now understand the keystone was commissioned and installed in the latter half of the 1960s when an addition to the 1918 Kanawha Banking and Trust Building was build just to the south and adjacent to the original structure.  The original structure is 12-story Neo-Classical Revival skyscraper, contributing to an interesting neighborhood in the city that is composed of the bookstore and numerous restaurants.

 

Charleston WV building detail

Charleston WV building detail

Charleston, West Virginia

I have a few more samples of architectural photography from our Charleston visit that I’ve been looking at.

If you watch cable home building and remodeling shows, you probably share the humor in seeing that every couple wants to “open up” the home, take down a wall, create spacious living.  That wall invariably always seems to have a pipe or wire in it that costs another thousand or two to remedy.  In this  Dezeen Magazine article, it details the reversal of this style where people are now asking for more walls, smaller and cozier spaces, private and intimate rooms of their own.  The article author attributes this to smart phones and tablets.  I think people are just tired at the end of the day and want to relax by themselves without listening to the game or whatever the husband, wife, son, daughter, partner, roommate wants to listen to.  Quietness just might be the new driving force in home and building design.

Dezeen is a great architectural photography site, by the way.

Mendelsohn’s Quality Shop 2015

Mendelsohn\'s Quality Shop 2015

Charelston, West Virginia

This building was the old Mendelsohn’s Quality Shop, another downtown business that met it’s demise after many years like so many we know of in our own towns and cities.   I found this excerpt online from the Charleston Gazette in 1998:

“After 85 years in the fashion business, The Quality Shop will close its doors at 908 Quarrier St. in August. What went wrong at the store that catered to women seeking better labels like Jantzen, Sanibel, Diane Roberts and Bleyle for more than eight decades? “A lack of business,” said Steve Seaman, who has operated the Quality Shop with his wife, Marialice, since buying the clothier in 1989 from the Mendelsohn family. “People aren’t dressing up like they used to. Demand for our clothing has been decreasing steadily. …”

 

Still Life Photo Session at OVCC

Still Life Photo Session at OVCC

Ohio Valley Camera Club
Huntington Museum of Art
Huntington, West Virginia

I attended the still life workshop at the OVCC tonight.  This clock wasn\’t part of the setups but late in the meeting some of us went around while I demonstrated off camera strobe lighting on some objects we found laying about.   It was nice to visit with everyone and talk photography.

 

On top of the world

On top of the world

Barboursville Community Park
Barboursville, West Virginia

This is a gem of a park, a little bit of something for just about everyone.

 "Pismire always said there were some
things you should care about enough to do badly."

The Carpet People (here at Amazon)
Terry Pratchett

 

 

The Magazine

The Magazine

I took my son and father on a drive this summer and we ended up at the Point Pleasant park at the confluence of the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers.  I love the park, it has a wonderful view looking down the river.  Real peaceful.  According to Wikipedia, it commemorates the battle where we took Kentucky from the Indians.

 

On the walkway to the camera club meeting

On the walkway to the camera club meeting

Huntington Museum of Art
Huntington, West Virginia

It was a full day of errands but ended with a nice meeting of the Ohio Valley Camera Club, then one of the best cobb salads that I’ve had in years, except now I’m wondering if they didn’t leave off the onions by mistake.   We had some wonderful light this evening and I caught this view while walking from the car into the club meeting.

“All in all you’re just another brick in the wall”

Pink Floyd

 

Folk art at HMOA

Folk art at HMOA

Huntington Museum of Art
Huntington, West Virginia

This shot is from a visit to the HMOA where I found some folk art on loan from  the Kentucky Folk Art Museum that is affiliated with the Morehead State University .  I have to confess that it has taken me awhile to start appreciating folk art, but after several visits to the museum in Morehead,  I’m finding many examples that I like now.