4 Remember

4 Remember

From a little trip to the University of Kentucky art museum last year.  This time, I found the correct parking garage.  On one of my previous trips, I had the misfortune in choosing the “wrong” garage.  On that visit, as is usual there, it was a terrific day in which I was befriended several times while on campus in ways that not only made us feel like special visitors but also saving us a good bit of money.  So while leaving that parking garage, the attendant, who seemed proud to take on the grumpy employee costume, says to me “that’ll be thirty dollars” then stares at me stoned face waiting for the usual response.  I decide to not play that game and so dug out the thirty dollars and politely said “why so much?”.  Then I received the scolding he so much wanted to give me, that I had parked in the wrong parking garage for visiting the campus.  I smiled and said, well all in all this day has been quite a bargain even with the parking fee.  I told him about  the free art gallery admission, how we so much enjoyed it,  and special treatment that we had received and hoped to see him again soon.  Then I inquired where he would like us to park on our next visit and received directions to this garage that yielded the “4 Remember” photo.  He was still staring at us when we left, I think he regretted not being able to have a shouting argument.

 

Moments

Moments

Out and about today- finding some good coffee and conversation with breakfast, then preparing for some projects before visiting around the Christmas tree.
“Wisdom. . .is knowing what
you have to accept.”
― Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose

at the depot at Russell, Kentucky

at the depot at Russell, Kentucky

Russell, Kentucky

This is another I-Phone4 VSCOcam shot of the Russell Depot caboose on display at the adjacent park grounds, sorry to use the Dutch Tilt again on you.  This small park gives me a great launching spot for my bicycling route- I can bike down the river road a few times then meander through a couple adjacent towns to get in about 12 miles in less than an hour.   I\’m very limited on the ability to travel right now, so you might see more I-Phone shots from our little river town for the upcoming days or weeks.   I\’m hoping to work up a day trip or two but nothing has come up just yet.

I wanted to mention Ralph Eugene Meatyard.  While browsing around the the VSCO website, I noticed a section called The Masters that featured a nice article about Meatyard and examples of his photography.  Meatyard was a Lexington, Kentucky resident during the decade prior to the time that I lived there, apparently when he was alive he was considered a big thing in the world of photographic art- his work included the use of his family as "subjects" in many of the shots.  Often described as highly disturbing, I certainly would call it cutting edge photography for the time period that he lived.  By the time I received my first camera and was roaming the Lexington area looking for photographs as a student, Meatyard had passed away and been forgotten.  I stumbled upon a print by Meatyard during a visit to the art gallery at the University of Kentucky a year or two ago.

Here is the link to the Masters article at VSCO, here is the Wikipedia article, then an article from New York Magazine.

 

 

 

Coral

Coral

Lexington, Kentucky

I rank aluminum awnings right up there with pay phones as being highly endangered and often photogenic, though I rarely get shots of them worth using.  For this trip, I ended up with 2 shots of awnings, the other one seems to defy a good simplifying crop but this one seems to lay out fine.  I like the 1960s-1970s look of the building.  I had a late-uncle, whom I barely remember, that installed aluminum awnings and siding in the early 1960s and some of his work is still standing and in good shape.  This awning is a bit different, being some sort of mini-slats that I like much better.  Did some yard work today and then visited bike shops, finding a helmet to fit my fat head but striking out on a road bike.  Someday, you will see shots from the road, I kid you not.  Snow might be flying, the cows might be coming home.  Here\’s a quote about cycling but aptly applies to photography as well, it seems to never get easier as you just find more problems with your subjects and images as you develop your eyes with your experience.

"It never gets easier,
you just go faster."

Rule #10,  The Rules
Keeper of the Cog
(atributed to Greg Lemans)

Building Number 20

Building Number 20

Lexington, Kentucky

This was probably the most interesting building of the whole day, problem is I didn’t realize this until reviewing my shots after arriving home.  I just love the old detail and patterns here, if you look on the far right edge of the frame you can see what we left behind unphotographed.  Nice old locks, windows, and ironwork.

Listening today to an old CD by Warren Zevon, the last one that he recorded when he was sick with cancer.  Now a good quote that we can identify with on most days.

“My memory is not even what most
people’s is, much less what it oughta
be for a discussion like this.”

Warren Zevon

 

601

601

Lexington, Kentucky

I was able to add a few shots to the “numbers” collection.  Having run out of photo ideas awhile ago, I figured the old cliche of shooting numbers is a never-fail idea since they are all around us.   With this one, I had in mind a black and white dark photo even at the time of shooting it but today I felt like a bit of color and so re-introduced some selective color back into the shot.

Today’s reading included the ongoing Hemingway short stories as well as an interesting New York Times article on the Stephen King family and all the authors that it includes.  I nearly always am more interested in the people and what makes them tick rather than their actions, so it was a pretty good read.

“I am the literary equivalent
of a Big Mac and fries.”

Stephen King

 

RPM

RPM

This gauge sits on a landing craft from WWII, on display at a small community park. I am acquainted with an older fellow who was the pilot of one of these boats and his stories are fascinating. The stories remind me that it must have been like driving a motorboat through hell, dodging things and watching soldiers jump overboard and sink because he couldn\’t get close enough, then with extra effort and throttle, finally ramming the craft on the beach so hard that it would take machinery to push him off while the machine guns fired at them. If we both make it to summer in good health, maybe I can get a nice portrait of him as he often spends the mornings sitting in the shade watching the world pass by.

This will be it for the week.

 

Foot Wash

Foot Wash
Last photograph for the week. I went out in search of pretty pictures and ended up with shots of old shoes of all things. I think I have enough for a series next week. Not exactly pretty pictures for the wall, but we\’ll see how it goes.

****************************
\’Hell, there are no rules
here! We\’re trying to get
something accomplished.\’

– Thomas Alva Edison
****************************

 
 

The letter L

The letter L

Here’s a picture of a swimming pool cover shot with the I-phone. Who would have thought you’d be doing everything with your phone other than actual talking, including photography. Certainly not Kodak or else they might not have filed for Chapter 11 this morning.

 

1949

1949

From the website The People History, these things happened in 1949:

-George Orwell\’s book Nineteen Eighty-Four is published
– 45 rpm discs are introduced
– First Polaroid Camera History sold for $89.95
– FILM Twelve O\’Clock High
-Frank Sinatra stars in \’On The Town\’ with Gene Kelly
-Rodgers and Hammerstein debut the musical \’South Pacific\’ on Broadway

 

1861 Parrott Rifle 20-pdr

1861 Parrott Rifle 20-pdr

Woodland Cemetery
Ironton, Ohio

This is the side view of one of the Civil War canons at the Woodland Cemetery. I was intrigued because of the mention of this gun in the memoirs of General Sherman. I had always thought of them as just ‘canons’ but they were officially called Parrott Rifles. We looked at 4 of them at the cemetery and a bit of internet research finds there may be a couple hundred of the tubes left around the country and maybe less than 60 of these 20 pounders. Using curves, I bumped the contrast so you can read the letters a bit better (which also increases the saturation and just looks a bit better to me). I believe this particular canon was produced in 1861 and had the serial number 21.

The WPF stands for West Point Foundry that lies along the Hudson River in New York. Apparently President Madison proposed a series of foundries to supply the country with war goods and the West Point location was a result of that.

The initials ‘R.P.P.’ stands for the inventor of this style of canon, Robert Parker Parrott. He was a West Point graduate and began working for the foundry a few decades before the Civil War. The Parrott rifle was a breakthrough weapon because of the way that it blended a cast iron rifled barrel with a stronger wrought iron sleeve that wrapped around the butt end of the gun tube. This allowed the gun to be produced in a way that was highly accurate but more inexpensive to produce.

These Woodland Cemetery canons represent the largest field artillery pieces commonly used in the Civil War. Evidently the smaller 10 pounders were much more prevalent because they would go into action with 150 projectiles vs 75 for these 20 pounders. The heavier 20 pounders also required a team of 7 horses to bring them into action. The range was surprising to me, Wikipedia lists it as 4,400 yards with a flight time of 17 seconds.

The guns weren’t without controversy, though. Evidently the barrels would sometimes blow away and the soldiers could be seen shooting away with a gun that was massively crippled. There were calls to ban them and I’ve read they were not well regarded in the field. This reminds me of the early M-16 controversy in Vietnam.

I’m not a Civil War expert, just enjoy history and finding out the origins of things so hopefully this bit of information is fairly accurate.

 

C448

C448

Catlettsburg, Ohio

This is a photograph of tied-up barges on the banks of the Ohio River. There’s something special about the quality of light at this location. There’s little to photograph but the barges, but I know there’s a few of us that find beauty in rust.

 

William

William

Manchester Founders Cemetery
along US 52 at Manchester, Ohio

Quite a few things came together to make a great day today- good scenery, music, food, and conversation. Today I found several photographs that I liked for a number of reasons.

 

Chic door

Chic door
Ashland, Kentucky

I spent time wandering around downtown today, then later in the evening walked around the park. I can tell when the end of a season is coming- it gets harder and harder to find things to photograph.

‘The ideal candidate will be a creative thinker
whose curiosity is punctuated by skepticism.’

Online help-wanted advertisement

Numbers

Numbers

Russell High School
Russell, Kentucky

Each year, during late summer, the marching band begins practicing in this parking lot. Each year, a new set of numbers appear. Wonder how they know which ones to use?

 

Bleachers at Russell High School

 Bleachers at Russell High School

Russell High School
Russell, Kentucky

It’s raining today, but we’ve got our fingers crossed for snow. Not sure where I got the following quote recently, but I appreciate it quite a lot. I think it applies quite well to high school days (which this shot reminds me of), as well as life in general:

 

‘It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.’

Henry David Thoreau